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Vincent Cay, PEARL CAYS, ATLANTIC COAST
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Bedrooms: 1-2 Bathrooms: 1 Sleeps: 2-4Type: Cabin
TWO CABANAS LOCATED ON 200M OF BEACH OVERLOOKING THE CARIBBEAN REEFS ON YOUR OWN PRIVATE 1 ACRE ISLAND WITH ALL FACILITIES. SNORKEL, SUNBATHE TAKE BOAT TRIPS, COOK, WILDLIFE WATCH, ITS YOUR ROBINSON C .... Read More
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NICARAGUA GUESTHOUSE, Managua, Managua
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Bedrooms: 1-3 Bathrooms: 4 Sleeps: 1-2Type: Home

      

Nicaragua

Nicaragua is best known not for its landscape or cultural treasures, but for the 1979 Sandinista revolution and subsequent Contra war. The good news is that throughout this period human rights have largely been respected and the country's battles are now confined to the political arena. Nicaragua is a fascinating destination for those travelers who shun seeing 'sights,' have an awareness of history and enjoy getting to know a country on a grassroots level.

Warning,Since the end of the civil war, armed criminal groups have operated out of the northern sectors of the country, especially along the Honduran border. Travelers visiting the border region should exercise a special measure of caution.

Nicaragua has two distinct seasons, the timing of which varies from coast to coast. The most pleasant time to visit the Pacific or central regions is early in the dry season (December and January), when temperatures are cooler and the foliage is still lush. With the possible exception of the last month of the dry season (usually mid-April to mid-May) when the land is parched and the air full of dust, there really is no bad time to visit.Nicaraguans spend Semana Santa (Holy Week) at the beach; all available rooms will be sold out weeks or even months in advance.

Each town and city in Nicaragua has annual celebrations for its patron saint. These celebrations (fiestas patronales) include distinctive masked processions and mock battles involving folkloric figures satirizing the Spanish conquistadors. The most famous of these saints' days are held in honor of San Sebastian (January) and Santiago (July).

The capital of Nicaragua is spread across the southern shore of Lago de Managua and is crowded with more than a quarter of Nicaragua's population. It's been racked by many natural disasters, including two earthquakes this century, and since the 1972 earthquake the city has had no center. Those returning to Managua after a few years will notice marked changes. An improving economy has produced a construction boom. Several of Managua's attractions stand around the Plaza de la República, including the lakeside municipal cathedral, which has been reconditioned with help from foreign donors and is now open to the public. Near the cathedral is the recently renovated Palacio Nacional, which has two giant paintings of Augusto Sandino and Carlos Fonseca at the entrance.The Huellas de Acahualinca museum houses the ancient footprints of people and animals running toward the lake from a volcanic eruption. The Museo de la Revolución has interesting historical exhibits with an emphasis on the revolutionary struggle of this century. There are also several lagunas, or volcanic crater lakes, which are popular swimming spots.

Unlike the rest of Nicaragua, the Caribbean coast was never colonized: It remained a British protectorate until the late 1800s. The only part of the rainforest-covered coast usually visited by travelers is Bluefields, but some visitors also head out to the Corn Islands (Islas del Maíz). The journey from Managua to Bluefields involves a five-hour boat trip down the Río Escondido. Bluefields' mix of ethnic groups - including Indians (Miskitos, Ramas and Sumos), blacks and mestizos from the rest of Nicaragua - makes it an interesting place, and the people here definitely like to have a good time; there are several reggae clubs and plenty of dancing on the weekends.

The Selva Negra (Black Forest) near Matagalpa, the mountains in the north and the islands in Lago de Nicaragua offer great hiking. Among the many spectacular volcanoes of interest for climbers are Volcán Masaya and the two volcanoes on Isla de Ometepe, Madera and Concepción. Lago de Nicaragua offers fantastic opportunities for fishing, and surfing is popular at Poneloya beach, near León, and at Playa Popoyo, near Rivas.

Nicaragua is the largest country in Central America. It's bordered to the north by Honduras, to the south by Costa Rica, to the east by the Caribbean Sea and to the west by the Pacific Ocean. The country has three distinct geographic regions: the Pacific lowlands, the north-central mountains and the Caribbean lowlands, also called the Mosquito Coast or Mosquitía. The fertile Pacific lowlands are interrupted by about 40 volcanoes, and dominated by Lago de Nicaragua, which is the largest lake in Central America. The Mosquito Coast is a sparsely populated rainforest area and the outlet for many of the large rivers originating in the central mountains. To date, 17% of the country has been given national-park status.

Lago de Nicaragua supports unusual fish, including the world's only freshwater sharks, as well as a huge variety of bird life. The cloud- and rainforests in the northwest contain abundant wildlife including ocelots, warthogs, pumas, jaguars, sloths and spider monkeys. Avian life in the forests is particularly rich: The cinnamon hummingbird, ruddy woodpecker, stripe-breasted wren, elegant trogon, shining hawk and even the quetzal, the holy bird of the Maya, can all be seen. The jungles on the Caribbean coast contain trees that grow up to almost 200ft (60m) high and are home to boas, anacondas, jaguars, deer and howler monkeys.

Nicaragua's climate varies according to altitude. The Pacific lowlands are always extremely hot, but the air is fresh and the countryside green during the rainy season (May to November); the dry season (December to April) brings winds that send clouds of brown dust across the plains. The Caribbean coast is hot and wet; it can rain heavily even during the brief dry season (March to May). The mountains of the north are much cooler than the lowlands.

For More Info See Nicaragua Travel Guide



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